zondag 3 juli 2011

Tentendorp Medinat al-Salam in Egypte hoeft niet op steun van Gaza flotilla te rekenen

 
Een schrijnend verhaal over werkelijk vergeten mensen. In dit tentenkamp in Egypte wonen meer dan 1.000 mensen.
 
There is only one bathroom for the entire tent camp. It is made of cubicles with a hole in the floor and a light sheet for a cover. The women complain of the lack of privacy and say they're scared to go to the bathroom at night.

With nothing but a rope to secure the entrance to each tent, residents say they are subjected to frequent attacks by criminals. Some local thieves use the camp as a hiding place after committing crimes in the neighborhood, while others have taken to stealing appliances belonging to the homeless families.

After repeated attacks on the tents and the rape of an 8-year-old boy, the men, whose work was already severely affected by the slumping economy, stop working completely. Instead, they stay with their families for protection, relying for financial support on friends and relatives.

Voor deze mensen is er geen UNRWA, de media berichten er niet over en linkse activisten staan niet voor ze op de bres. Eergisteren presteerde Hasna Al Maroudi het om in Uitgesproken Vara te zeggen dat 'het ongelofelijk gemeen is van de wereld dat men wel voor de rest van de wereld in de bres springt en meteen wil ingrijpen, maar voor Gaza interesseert men zich niet, terwijl daar al jaren een gigantische crisis is'. Ongelofelijk inderdaad hoe iemand zoiets met droge ogen kan beweren. In Syrië worden duizenden vreedzame demonstranten afgeslacht en gemarteld, en het westen kijkt er naar en doet niks, Iran onderdrukt minderheden en lapt het internationale recht aan haar laars, Saudi-Arabië doet wat het wil, trekt zich van onze ideeën over vrouwenrechten en vrijheid geen barst aan, enzovoorts.
Er is juist erg veel aandacht voor Gaza en de inwoners krijgen per persoon meer geld dan welke groep vluchtelingen ook. Daarmee zijn ze nog niet vrij, maar dat ligt voor een groot deel aan hun eigen politieke keuze voor Hamas, en het respressieve karakter van Hamas' bestuur, en natuurlijk Hamas' vijandigheid tegenover Israel. En voor geen enkel ander volk hebben zogenaamde vredesactivisten zoveel aandacht als voor de Palestijnen. Van de aandacht die de Palestijnen van de VN, de EU, in de media en van vooral linkse politieke partijen en actiegroepen krijgen kunnen echt onderdrukte en machteloze volken slechts dromen.
 
RP
-----------
 

Arabs that the flotilla ignores: The tent city of Medinat al-Salam

http://elderofziyon.blogspot.com/2011/06/arabs-that-flotilla-ignores-tent-city.html

 

 From Al Masry al-Youm:

Beschrijving: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8lGw-Ap1R4o/TgqCiOk1bwI/AAAAAAAAEYM/G1mAepxtNNE/s400/tent_city_at_medinat_al-salaam.jpg 

Naglaa Mahdy sleeps in a tent with ten other women and their children. She wakes up and dusts herself off, then she tries to figure out how to feed herself and her family on her tiny budget.

Mahdy is one of over 1000 people who, after being evicted from their rented apartments in February, have been living in tents in Medinat al-Salam.

After cooking on a stove she borrowed from another tent (all of her home appliances have been stolen), Mahdy spends the rest of the day waiting for representatives from the governorate, who visit periodically to assess the families and determine who deserves an apartment.

This is life in the Medinat al-Salam tent city [in Egypt.] Some residents have brought their protests to central Cairo and attracted attention to their cause, but many more continue their threadbare existence under canvas.

Mahdy is still mourning the loss of her baby, who was born prematurely a week ago. The baby died three days later because Mahdy couldn't afford the necessary medical treatment. Despite her physical and emotional pain, Mahdy still congregates with the other residents of the tent city whenever a governorate representative arrives. She is desperately trying to secure an apartment for herself, her husband and her remaining two children.

During the security vacuum that began on 28 January, landlords in Medinat al-Salam worried that tenants would take over their apartments and refuse to leave when their contracts expired. In a preemptive move against having their apartments stolen, landlords terminated renters' contracts and evicted them from their homes.

In February, the evicted families were promised apartments within a month and housed in tents in the Sbiko area in Medinat al-Salam under orders from Prime Minister Essam Sharaf.

Early this month, the governor of Cairo announced the allocation of 126 apartments for the evicted residents, and a renewed investigation into the cases of another 293 families. The rest of the tent city's residents were deemed undeserving by the governor, who claimed that they had already received apartments.

They deny the governor's claims and complain that the majority of the apartments were allocated to people from other areas. The tent dwellers assert that they have no other assets, despite the governorate officials' claims that they do. The tent dwellers say this is simply a ruse on behalf of the authorities to justifiy denying compensation. The residents say that although there is a minority of "powerful people" among them who have assets, most families have next to nothing.

"If I had any assets, would I have exposed myself and my kids to this unbearable life?" said Marwa Zawam, one of the residents.

Residents say that those among them with connections and money are making trouble for the rest of them. They say that these people bribe governorate workers to allocate apartments for them, and keep other families from making contact with officials.

Every tent, the size of a small room, houses ten families. Women and children sleep in the tents at night while the men keep watch. Come daybreak, the women and children step outside and the men file in for their turn at sleeping.

Sleeping on a thin cover, the residents spend the night on the sandy floor, an arrangement that many say has given them breathing problems.

Warda Zeid has been in and out of hospitals for the past six months with two of her three children who have allergies.

"This child starts getting convulsions in the middle of the night; I take him and run to the hospital. I don't know what to do," says Zeid, holding her three-year-old child.

There is only one bathroom for the entire tent camp. It is made of cubicles with a hole in the floor and a light sheet for a cover. The women complain of the lack of privacy and say they're scared to go to the bathroom at night.

With nothing but a rope to secure the entrance to each tent, residents say they are subjected to frequent attacks by criminals. Some local thieves use the camp as a hiding place after committing crimes in the neighborhood, while others have taken to stealing appliances belonging to the homeless families.

After repeated attacks on the tents and the rape of an 8-year-old boy, the men, whose work was already severely affected by the slumping economy, stop working completely. Instead, they stay with their families for protection, relying for financial support on friends and relatives.

 

 Meanwhile Gazans living in the worst camps get free housing, free medical care and free education. 

There are no flotillas for residents of the tent city of Medinat al-Salam, since their misery cannot be blamed on Jews. 

 

 

 

Geen opmerkingen:

Een reactie plaatsen