vrijdag 4 januari 2013

Peiling: meerderheid Israeli's willen tweestatenoplossing

 
Het zou interessant zijn om deze opiniepeiling met eerdere peilingen te vergelijken, maar dan moeten de vragen wel hetzelfde geformuleerd zijn.
Bijv. 62% van de Israeli's willen volgens deze peiling een tweestatenoplossing. In een peiling uit 2009 zei 78% bereid te zijn een tweestatenoplossing te accepteren, maar door de andere manier van vragen kan men zeker niet zonder meer beweren dat de steun hiervoor is afgenomen.

Responding to the question "Which scenario would you prefer in order for the state of Israel to maintain its democratic and Jewish character in twenty years time?" 22% said they believe the status quo will continue (without annexing the territories) whilst 13% believe Israel will annex the territories without giving Palestinians full civil rights, and a minority of 7% predict annexing what they see as Judea and Samaria with full civil rights for citizens. The remaining 58%, as stated, predict two states living side by side with fixed borders.

 According to the poll, a majority of 62% of the Israeli public support the principle of "two states for two peoples," whilst a large majority (78%) are concerned about the possibility that Israel will become a bi-national state. 

 
Wouter

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The Jerusalem Post  

Poll: Majority of Israelis prefer two state solution

By GABRIELLA WEINIGER

12/18/2012 11:55

Smith Research poll shows majority of Israelis fear a bi-national state; youth hold more right-wing positions.

 

http://www.jpost.com/DiplomacyAndPolitics/Article.aspx?id=296405 

 

 A clear majority of Israelis believe that the establishment of a demilitarized Palestinian state is Israel's best chance to remain a Jewish and democratic state in twenty years time, a Smith Research poll showed on Monday. 

 

 The survey, commissioned by Blue and White Future, was conducted among 500 respondents from a representative sample of the adult Jewish population in Israel.

 According to the survey, 58% of Israelis would prefer to see Israel remain as a Jewish, democratic state through fixed state borders along the route of the West Bank security barrier, seeing Israel preserve its character alongside a demilitarized Palestinian state. 

 

 Responding to the question "Which scenario would you prefer in order for the state of Israel to maintain its democratic and Jewish character in twenty years time?" 22% said they believe the status quo will continue (without annexing the territories) whilst 13% believe Israel will annex the territories without giving Palestinians full civil rights, and a minority of 7% predict annexing what they see as Judea and Samaria with full civil rights for citizens. The remaining 58%, as stated, predict two states living side by side with fixed borders. 

 

 According to the poll, a majority of 62% of the Israeli public support the principle of "two states for two peoples," whilst a large majority (78%) are concerned about the possibility that Israel will become a bi-national state. 

 

 The survey shows that younger people have more right-wing positions than adults, with 69% of respondents aged fifty and above supporting the principle of "two states for two peoples" compared to 63% among those aged 30-49 and 42% of those aged 18-29. 

 

 Further, 25% of those aged 18-29 supported a scenario involving the annexation of the territories without giving full rights to the Palestinians in order to keep Israel a Jewish and democratic state, compared with 16% of those aged 30-49 and 7% aged fifty and above. 

 

 The Co-Chairman of Blue and White Future, Gilad Sher commented on the findings, saying: "The public is beginning to internalize the idea that a Jewish, democratic Israel needs to be separated from the Palestinians, with or without a [peace] agreement." 

 He added that it is the responsibility of the government to push the two state solution forward in the interest of Israel's national security. 

 

 In a related research study by the Israel Democracy Institute, 58% of Israelis do not believe that a two-state solution will end the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.  

 The results were revealed during a panel discussion at the Sapir College in Sderot on Tuesday titled "Agreement for Peace" which engaged public opinion about the conflict and premises for its resolution.

 Prof. Tamar Hermann presented a study carried out by the Israel Democracy Institute which dealt with the question: "What is the position of the Jewish public in Israel towards peace with the Palestinians?"

 The research showed that peace with the Palestinians in 2012 is not one of the top priorities for citizens of Israel. Further, it showed the social justice protests of 2011 had "almost no effect" on the rate of achieving peace with the Palestinians. 

 

 According to the study, the importance of peace and security in 2012 is one of the lowest measured priorities for the Israeli public. It's index, according to the study, is 14.7, compared to 56.8 in 1969.

 MK Aryeh Eldad commented on the findings, saying the public is "not ready to buy the faulty product we call Oslo," adding that partition cannot solve the conflict which is centered around far more than just territory.

 

 

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