woensdag 21 maart 2012

Knesset verbiedt 'Auschwitz look' voor Israelische modellen (wie volgt?)

 

Israel heeft dinsdag een nieuwe wet aangenomen in de strijd tegen anorexia. Een goed initiatief, en ook moedig dat de staat zich durft te bemoeien met een dergelijke zaak. Natuurlijk zal dit door antizionisten tegen Israel worden gebruikt. Men wil door dit verbod natuurlijk de aandacht afleiden van de doodhongerende Palestijnen, die tegen hun wil vast ook een BMI van onder de 18,5 hebben (NB in Gaza schijnt obesitas een veel voorkomende ziekte te zijn maar dat ter zijde). Hoe dan ook, de mode wereld is wat dit betreft echt doorgeschoten en het is goed dat daar aandacht voor is.

Uruguayan model, Luisel Ramos, 22, collapsed soon after stepping off the runway in August 2006, reportedly of anorexia-linked heart failure.

Other governments have taken steps to prevent “size zero” medical problems, but have shied from legislation.

The Madrid fashion show bans women whose BMI is below 18. Milan’s fashion week bans models with a BMI below 18.5.

RP

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Pukewashing: Knesset votes to ban underweight models in ads (includes gratuitous photos)

http://elderofziyon.blogspot.com/2012/03/pukewashing-knesset-votes-to-ban.html

 

From Ha'aretz:

 

The Knesset yesterday passed a law banning the use of underweight models in advertising. The so-called "Photoshop law" also requires that any ad agency digitally altering photos to make models look thinner must disclose the fact in the advert.

The legislation is an effort to change idealized perceptions of beauty that, according to evidence presented to the Knesset, encourages eating disorders such as anorexia.

The law also bars the use of overly thin images from foreign advertising here, as defined by the commonly used medical measure of body mass index. Models with an index of 18.5 or less - or who appear to have such a low index - will not be allowed to appear in advertising.

Data from the Knesset's Research and Information Center presented at legislative hearings revealed that there are about 1,500 children, including teenagers, diagnosed with eating disorders in Israel annually. Evidence presented to the Knesset showed that exposure to idealized media images of bodies is one risk factor in developing an eating disorder, by glorifying the thin body.

 

As every Israel hater knows, this is a transparent attempt on the part of Knesset to distract the world from Israeli crimes. It is pukewashing.

Alisa Gourari, an 18-year-old model who was runner-up in the World Super Model competition, has modeled for Max Mara and Valentino. She has starred in a number of Israeli advertising campaigns but is too thin to meet the requirements of the new law. She said the debate over underweight models is important, but she too said the law applied limits without regard to whether the model was healthy at his or her weight. 

 

Here is Gourari:

She does look scarily skinny.

Here are some of the 55 other Israeli models from Fashion Model Directory. Unfortunately, they do not mention the models' weights, so I cannot calculate which ones would be affected by this law. You guys will have to do the exhaustive research yourselves.

Israela Avtau

 

 

‘THEY LOOK LIKE DEAD GIRLS’: NEW ISRAELI LAW BANS UNDERWEIGHT MODELS IN ADS

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/they-look-like-dead-girls-new-israeli-law-bans-underweight-models-in-ads/

Posted on March 20, 2012 at 6:46am by Billy Hallowell

 

JERUSALEM (AP) — A new Israeli law is trying to fight the spread of eating disorders by banning underweight models from local advertising and requiring publications to disclose when they use altered images to make women and men appear thinner.

The law, passed late Monday, appears to be the first attempt by any government to use legislation to take on a fashion industry accused of abetting eating disorders by idealizing extreme thinness. It could become a model for other countries grappling with the spread of anorexia and bulimia, particularly among young women.

 

 

An Israeli walks past an advertising displayed on a main street in Tel Aviv, Israel, on Monday, March 19, 2012. A new Israeli law, passed late Monday, is trying to fight the spread of eating disorders by banning underweight models from local advertising. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

The law’s supporters said they hoped it would encourage the use of healthy models in local advertising and heighten awareness of digital tricks that transform already thin women into illusory waifs.

 

“We want to break the illusion that the model we see is real,” said Liad Gil-Har, assistant to law sponsor Dr. Rachel Adato, who compares the battle against eating disorders to the struggle against smoking.

In Israel, about 2 percent of all girls between 14 and 18 have severe eating disorders, which is a statistic similar to other developed countries, said anthropologist Sigal Gooldin who studies eating disorders.

 

The new law requires models to produce a medical report, dating back no more than three months, at every shoot that will be used on the Israeli market, stating that they are not malnourished by World Health Organization standards.

The U.N. agency uses a standard known as the body mass index – calculated by dividing weight by height – to determine malnutrition. WHO says a body-mass index below 18.5 is indicative of malnutrition, said Adato, a gynecologist.

 

 

Any advertisement published for the Israeli market must also have a clearly written notice disclosing if the model used in it was digitally altered to make her, or him, look thinner. The law will not apply to foreign publications sold in Israel.

The law was championed by one of Israel’s top model agents, Adi Barkan, who said in 30 years of work, he saw young women become skinnier and sicker while struggling to fit the shrinking mold of what the industry considered attractive.

“They look like dead girls,” Barkan said.

 

Critics said the legislation should have focused on health, not weight, saying many models were naturally very thin.

“The health of the model … should be evaluated. Our weight can change hour to hour,” said David Herzog, a professor of psychiatry and a leading U.S. expert on eating disorders.

 

Top Israeli model Adi Neumman said she wouldn’t pass under the new rules, because her BMI was 18.3. Neumman said she ate well and exercised. She said legislation should have focused on health and well-being, not weight.

“Force actual tests. Make girls go to a doctor. Get a system to follow girls who are found to be puking,” she said.

Legislator Adato said only 5 percent of women had BMI that naturally fell under 18.5.

“On the one hand, maybe we’ll hurt a few models,” Adato said. “On the other hand, we’ll save a lot of children.”

Pressure on the fashion industry has intensified in recent years, sparked by the deaths of models in Brazil and Uruguay from medical complications linked to eating disorders.

 

Uruguayan model, Luisel Ramos, 22, collapsed soon after stepping off the runway in August 2006, reportedly of anorexia-linked heart failure.

Other governments have taken steps to prevent “size zero” medical problems, but have shied from legislation.

The Madrid fashion show bans women whose BMI is below 18. Milan’s fashion week bans models with a BMI below 18.5.

 

 

The U.K. and U.S. have guidelines, but the fashion industry is self-regulated. 

 

Unrealistic body images in the media are believed to shape eating habits, especially among young people, though there is debate about how influential they are.

Gooldin, the anthropologist, said young women used in television, movies and advertisements as references for the ideal body, rather than the women around them.

“There’s a gap between our own bodies … and ideal bodies. They keep shrinking and getting smaller,” she said. 

 

It’s not clear whether the law will have a measurable impact, because Israeli teens take their cues from both international media and local publications, Gooldin said. And the ban isn’t likely to affect many – there are only about 300 professional models in Israel, and only a few work abroad, said agent Barkan and model Neumman.

But Gooldin said it was a positive step to deal with a problem that has plagued Western societies.

 

Legislator Adato said she hoped Israel would be an example other countries could study.

“You don’t need to be underweight to be beautiful, or successful,” she said.

 

 

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